Publication: Paper/Books

Bacterial Community Diversity in Soil Under two Tillage Practices as Determined by Pyrosequencing

Microb Ecology 70(3): 853–859

Abstract

The ability of soil to provide ecosystem services is dependent on microbial diversity, with 80–90 % of the pro- cesses in soil being mediated by microbes. There still exists a knowledge gap in the types of microorganisms present in soil and how soil management affects them. However, identification of microorganisms is severely limited by classical culturing techniques that have been traditionally used in laboratories. Metagenomic approaches are increasingly becoming common, with current high- throughput sequencing approaches allowing for more in-depth analysis. We conducted a preliminary analysis of bacterial diversity in soils from the longest continuously maintained no-till (NT) plots in the world (52 years) and in adjacent plow-till (PT) plots in Ohio, USA man- aged similarly except for tillage. Bacterial diversity was determined using a culture-independent approach of high-throughout pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Proteobacteria and Acidobacteria were predominant in both samples but the NT soil had a higher number of reads, bacterial richness, and five unique phyla. Four unique phyla were observed in PT and 99 % of the community had relative abundance of <1 %. Plowing and secondary tillage tend to homogenize the soil and reduces the unique (i.e., diverse) microenvironments where microbial populations can reside. We conclude that tillage leads to fewer dominant species being present in soil and that these species contribute to a higher percentage of the total community. 

Citation

Sengupta, A., Dick, W.A. (2015): Bacterial Community Diversity in Soil Under two Tillage Practices as Determined by Pyrosequencing . Microb Ecology 70(3): 853–859. doi: 10.1007/s00248-015-0609-4