EVENTS

Past Events

DNA Extraction!

April 13, 2013; 10:00 AM - 2:00 PM
University of Arizona BIO5 Ambassadors

University of Arizona Sonoran Desert Discovery

April 20, 2013; 11:00 AM - 3:00 PM
Sharing ecology and natural history through outreach and service learning. UA students have developed engaging hands-on workshops about various Sonoran Desert topics. Come learn with us! For more information visit sdd.arizona.edu. Workshops are appropriate for all ages! For more information, please see Sonoran Desert Discovery.

Physics Factory

April 20, 2013; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
The Physics Factory is a team of scientists and educators with a common goal: to share their enthusiasm for physics with the community! Through a combination of hands-on learning and eye-popping demonstrations, The Physics Factory aims to show that physics is an exciting process of discovery and invention! Come participate in the fun! For more information about this group, please see The Physics Factory.

Physics Factory

May 4, 2013; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
The Physics Factory is a team of scientists and educators with a common goal: to share their enthusiasm for physics with the community! Through a combination of hands-on learning and eye-popping demonstrations, The Physics Factory aims to show that physics is an exciting process of discovery and invention! Come participate in the fun! For more information about this group, please see The Physics Factory.

Physics Factory

March 23, 2013; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
The Physics Factory is a team of scientists and educators with a common goal: to share their enthusiasm for physics with the community! Through a combination of hands-on learning and eye-popping demonstrations, The Physics Factory aims to show that physics is an exciting process of discovery and invention! Come participate in the fun! For more information about this group, please see The Physics Factory.

Geology Days at Biosphere 2!

February 16, 2013; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
Geological History of the Santa Catalina Mountains. Biosphere 2 is located in the beautiful Santa Catalina Mountains – how and when did the mountains form? Examine the oldest (1.7 billion years old) and the youngest (28 million years old) and many of the in-between rocks while you learn about the formation of the mountain range.
Rocks, Rocks, and More Rocks. Rocks are all around us and very visible in Arizona. Learn how to identify a few minerals and how to use them to identify most of the common rocks in the area.
Karen J. Gray has an MS in Geology from George Washington University and worked for the U.S. Geological Survey for 24 years. She was involved with many projects, including the study of rock and mineral chemistry and age dating to learn the history of granites, rhyolites and basalts, and the mineral resources associated with them, in many parts of the U.S., Costa Rica, and the Afar region of Ethiopia.

Physics Factory

February 23, 2013; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
The Physics Factory is a team of scientists and educators with a common goal: to share their enthusiasm for physics with the community! Through a combination of hands-on learning and eye-popping demonstrations, The Physics Factory aims to show that physics is an exciting process of discovery and invention! Come participate in the fun! For more information about this group, please see The Physics Factory.

Physics Factory

January 19, 2013; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
The Physics Factory is a team of scientists and educators with a common goal: to share their enthusiasm for physics with the community! Through a combination of hands-on learning and eye-popping demonstrations, The Physics Factory aims to show that physics is an exciting process of discovery and invention! Come participate in the fun! For more information about this group, please see The Physics Factory.

Geology Days at Biosphere 2!

January 19, 2013; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
Geological History of the Santa Catalina Mountains. Biosphere 2 is located in the beautiful Santa Catalina Mountains – how and when did the mountains form? Examine the oldest (1.7 billion years old) and the youngest (28 million years old) and many of the in-between rocks while you learn about the formation of the mountain range.
Rocks, Rocks, and More Rocks. Rocks are all around us and very visible in Arizona. Learn how to identify a few minerals and how to use them to identify most of the common rocks in the area.
Karen J. Gray has an MS in Geology from George Washington University and worked for the U.S. Geological Survey for 24 years. She was involved with many projects, including the study of rock and mineral chemistry and age dating to learn the history of granites, rhyolites and basalts, and the mineral resources associated with them, in many parts of the U.S., Costa Rica, and the Afar region of Ethiopia.

Geology Days at Biosphere 2!

December 29, 2012; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
Geological History of the Santa Catalina Mountains. Biosphere 2 is located in the beautiful Santa Catalina Mountains – how and when did the mountains form? Examine the oldest (1.7 billion years old) and the youngest (28 million years old) and many of the in-between rocks while you learn about the formation of the mountain range.
Rocks, Rocks, and More Rocks. Rocks are all around us and very visible in Arizona. Learn how to identify a few minerals and how to use them to identify most of the common rocks in the area.
Karen J. Gray has an MS in Geology from George Washington University and worked for the U.S. Geological Survey for 24 years. She was involved with many projects, including the study of rock and mineral chemistry and age dating to learn the history of granites, rhyolites and basalts, and the mineral resources associated with them, in many parts of the U.S., Costa Rica, and the Afar region of Ethiopia.

Physics Factory

December 29, 2012; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
The Physics Factory is a team of scientists and educators with a common goal: to share their enthusiasm for physics with the community! Through a combination of hands-on learning and eye-popping demonstrations, The Physics Factory aims to show that physics is an exciting process of discovery and invention! Come participate in the fun! For more information about this group, please see The Physics Factory.

Brain Science!

November 10, 2012; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
Why can’t you taste much when you have a cold? How much does being distracted affect your response times? How do those connections between nerve cells really work? What cool things can you do to trick your brain? Get answers to these questions (and more!) and have fun at the Brain Science Table today!

Physics Factory

October 20, 2012; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
The Physics Factory is a team of scientists and educators with a common goal: to share their enthusiasm for physics with the community! Through a combination of hands-on learning and eye-popping demonstrations, The Physics Factory aims to show that physics is an exciting process of discovery and invention! Come participate in the fun! For more information about this group, please see The Physics Factory.

World Oceans Day

June 8-9, 2012
On World Oceans Day people around the planet celebrate and honor the body of water which links us all, for what it provides humans and what it represents. Be a part of this growing global celebration this year at Biosphere 2! Activities and events include:

  • Special ocean-themed talks and presentations!
  • Hands-on activities – learn about the ocean and its creatures by touching and handling a wide variety of marine artifacts and organisms!
  • 24-hours-in-the-ocean event!
  • Touch tank with several species of marine organisms to experience!
  • Species introduction in the ocean biome – watch as 50 Sergeant Major fish are released into the ocean biome!
  • Scuba diver encounter!
  • Eco-education booths, companies and vendors displaying environmentally friendly efforts and  products!
  • Special tours – visitors will get to go on the beach in the ocean biome-  the only day of the year this is possible!

Physics Factory

May 12, 2012; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
The Physics Factory is a team of scientists and educators with a common goal: to share their enthusiasm for physics with the community! Through a combination of hands-on learning and eye-popping demonstrations, The Physics Factory aims to show that physics is an exciting process of discovery and invention! Come participate in the fun! For more information about this group, please see The Physics Factory.

Biosphere 2 Earth Day Celebration

April 21, 2012; 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM
See the unveiling of the Omani Falaj Indoor and Outdoor Water Oasis Exhibits. The University of Arizona Biosphere 2 Earth Day Celebration in partnership with The UA School of Music. Science, music, food and fun for the whole family!

University of Arizona Sonoran Desert Discovery

April 7, 2012; 11:00 AM - 3:00 PM
Sharing ecology and natural history through outreach and service learning. UA students have developed engaging hands-on workshops about various Sonoran Desert topics. Come learn with us! For more information visit sdd.arizona.edu. Workshops are appropriate for all ages! For more information, please see Sonoran Desert Discovery.

Should I Stay or Should I Go?  Dispersal Decisions Faced by Young Mammals

April 7, 2012; 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
Melissa Merrick, Biosphere 2 Science and Society Fellow, UA School of Natural Resources and the Environment
​Almost all young mammals face a difficult decision in their lives: should they remain in their natal area or set out to find a new place to live? This is among the most important decisions an animal can make in terms of future survival and reproductive success. Wildlife biologist Melissa Merrick will discuss the dispersal process from the perspective of young sky island tree squirrels and other small mammals, highlighting dispersal strategies, the role of behavior, and the difficulties dispersing juveniles face in fragmented landscapes. Come find out why dispersal is so important for all mammal populations (including humans!) and join the discussion.  Visit Melissa's Blog - Visit Melissa’s Webpage

Physics Factory

April 7, 2012; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
The Physics Factory is a team of scientists and educators with a common goal: to share their enthusiasm for physics with the community! Through a combination of hands-on learning and eye-popping demonstrations, The Physics Factory aims to show that physics is an exciting process of discovery and invention! Come participate in the fun! For more information about this group, please see The Physics Factory.

Mosquitoes of Tucson and Southern Arizona

March 31, 2012; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
Melinda Butterworth, Biosphere 2 Science and Society Fellow, UA School of Geography and Development
Think all mosquitoes are the same? Think again! There are over 40 species of mosquitoes in Arizona, and they have different personalities. This browse table will highlight ongoing research at the UofA that is studying where in Tucson mosquitoes like to spend their time. Stop by to learn about trapping, identifying, and researching mosquitoes in our area. Activities include demonstrations of mosquito trapping, mosquito specimens that can be viewed under magnifying glasses, coloring and crosswords for kids, and some useful info that might help you figure out which mosquitoes are in your yard, and how to get rid of them!.  Visit Mindy's Blog

Science Sunday: The Fin Foundation

March 25, 2012; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
The Fin Foundation reaches out into the community with presentations on ocean life and marine conservation. Using marine artifacts such as shark jaws and shells for hands-on learning experiences, The Fin Foundation allows people who live far from the ocean to experience sea life up close! In addition to marine artifacts, the Fin Foundation uses vivid photography and video images to enhance presentations. The Fin Foundation presents to all ages from pre-school through college and for a wide variety of community groups. The Fin Foundation is a consortium of marine biologists, educators, ocean enthusiasts, photographers and community volunteers working to bring marine science and ocean awareness to communities across the Southwest.

Biodiversity in Southern Arizona

March 24, 2012; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
Lily House-Peters, Biosphere 2 Science and Society Fellow, UA School of Geography and Development
Join Lily as she guides you through maps of the Upper San Pedro River and the Rio Sonora (both riparian areas), and photos of specific reaches of the rivers taken at different points during the 20th century. These photos will highlight 1) vegetation change, such as mesquite encroachment and cottonwood forest maturation, 2) changes in human activity in the floodplain, including agricultural and ranching practices, 3) changes in urban growth and settlement patterns in the region, and 4) conservation, specifically the establishment of the San Pedro Riparian National Conservation Area (SPRNCA). Lily will also provide leaf samples of different keystone riparian species, such as mesquite and cottonwood, and photos of a range of the animals that depend on the riparian area to highlight biodiversity.

Cheek Cell DNA Extraction Adventure!

March 24, 2012; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
The University of Arizona BIO5 Ambassadors will be sharing a fun cheek-cell DNA extraction activity that takes only 5 minutes to complete!  This simple activity is great for all age groups. You begin by swishing with salt water, which becomes a sample of your own cells for the experiment. The sample is then slowly mixed with simple household dish soap, which breaks open your cells. Next, ethanol (an alcohol, similar to that found in hand sanitizer) is added to the solution. Your DNA is incompatible with the ethanol, so you will be able to watch as it becomes visible to the naked eye. Make a necklace to take home with you and share the wonder of your very own DNA!  Come have fun learning with us!

Physics Factory

March 17, 2012; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
The Physics Factory is a team of scientists and educators with a common goal: to share their enthusiasm for physics with the community! Through a combination of hands-on learning and eye-popping demonstrations, The Physics Factory aims to show that physics is an exciting process of discovery and invention! Come participate in the fun!

Geology Days at Biosphere 2!

March 17, 2012; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
Geological History of the Santa Catalina Mountains. Biosphere 2 is located in the beautiful Santa Catalina Mountains – how and when did the mountains form? Examine the oldest (1.7 billion years old) and the youngest (28 million years old) and many of the in-between rocks while you learn about the formation of the mountain range.
Rocks, Rocks, and More Rocks. Rocks are all around us and very visible in Arizona. Learn how to identify a few minerals and how to use them to identify most of the common rocks in the area.
Karen J. Gray has an MS in Geology from George Washington University and worked for the U.S. Geological Survey for 24 years. She was involved with many projects, including the study of rock and mineral chemistry and age dating to learn the history of granites, rhyolites and basalts, and the mineral resources associated with them, in many parts of the U.S., Costa Rica, and the Afar region of Ethiopia.

How Do Scientists Do Their Jobs? What Kinds Of Tools Do They Use?

March 3, 2012; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
Marielle Smith, Biosphere 2 Science and Society Fellow, UA Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
Join Marielle as she guides you in taking measurements of plants, (e.g. photosynthesis) with the Li-COR instrument and measures of stomatal conductance with a porometer. Some of the plants will have been well-watered prior to the event, and others not watered at all, allowing her to explain the difference in responses between individuals.

GAK?!  University of Arizona Tau Beta Pi Engineering Honor Society

February 25, 2012; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
What in the world is GAK? Come find out in this interesting and fun hands-on activity! Learn about interesting properties of matter as you interact with University of Arizona engineering honor students! The local chapter of Tau Beta Pi, organized at the University of Arizona, was the first in Arizona (founded in 1926) and has been run continuously ever since.

The Formation of the Santa Catalina Mountains

February 18, 2012; 12:00 - 1:00 PM
Looking at the formation of the Santa Catalina Mountains over 2 billion years by examining some events that are happening today, for example Chile and Japan earthquakes, sea level rising, erosion, and basin and range extension. Karen J. Gray will show rocks that formed at different times during the 2 billion years – visitors will handle rocks that range in age from 1.7 billion years old to as young as 26 million years old. She has an MS in Geology from George Washington University and worked for the U.S. Geological Survey for 24 years. She was involved with many projects, including the study of rock and mineral chemistry and age dating to learn the history of granites, rhyolites and basalts, and the mineral resources associated with them, in many parts of the U.S., Costa Rica, and the Afar region of Ethiopia.

Lessons from Our Ancestors: Archaeological Insights on Humans and the Environment

February 18, 2012; 2:00 - 3:00 PM
Matthew Pailes, Biosphere 2 Science and Society Fellow, UA School of Anthropology
What can the past teach us about modern ecological challenges, and vice versa, how can we use the present to interpret the obstacles faced by our ancestors? Archaeologist Matthew Pailes will discuss the unique insights that can be gained by taking a very long-term view on human-environment relationships. He will draw examples from around the world and over the span of human history to explain common patterns of human behavior. The prehistory of the U.S. Southwest will provide the most in-depth case study. So come hear how Sonoran bootleggers and modern haggling over the price of rice in India can be used to explain the decisions made by local farmers 700 years ago.

Physics Factory

February 11, 2012; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
The Physics Factory is a team of scientists and educators with a common goal: to share their enthusiasm for physics with the community! Through a combination of hands-on learning and eye-popping demonstrations, The Physics Factory aims to show that physics is an exciting process of discovery and invention! Come participate in the fun!

Physics Factory

January 7, 2012; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
The Physics Factory is a team of scientists and educators with a common goal: to share their enthusiasm for physics with the community! Through a combination of hands-on learning and eye-popping demonstrations, The Physics Factory aims to show that physics is an exciting process of discovery and invention! Come participate in the fun!

Physics Factory

December 31, 2011; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
The Physics Factory is a team of scientists and educators with a common goal: to share their enthusiasm for physics with the community! Through a combination of hands-on learning and eye-popping demonstrations, The Physics Factory aims to show that physics is an exciting process of discovery and invention! Come participate in the fun!

From Microbes to Mosquitoes: Environment, Health, and How it is Managed

December 10, 2011; 2:00 - 3:00 PM
Mindy Butterworth, Biosphere 2 Science and Society Fellow, UA School of Geography and Development
This talk will discuss how the environment influences mosquitoes and the microbes that they transmit. How a changing climate may also impact mosquito-borne diseases (particularly dengue fever), the limitations of these projections, and how mosquitoes are managed by the public and health authorities will also be explored. Attention will be paid to the global situation of disease, but specific examples used will be from the southwest US and highlight work currently underway at the University of Arizona.

Physics Factory

December 10, 2011; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
The Physics Factory is a team of scientists and educators with a common goal: to share their enthusiasm for physics with the community! Through a combination of hands-on learning and eye-popping demonstrations, The Physics Factory aims to show that physics is an exciting process of discovery and invention! Come participate in the fun!

The Secret Lives of Mammals: Tools to Capture, Track, Monitor, and Learn About Our Elusive Neighbors

November 26, 2011; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
Melissa Merrick, Biosphere 2 Science and Society Fellow, UA School of Natural Resources and the Environment
The southwest is home to the highest mammalian biodiversity in North America outside of the tropics, yet most mammals are seldom seen. Mammals are harder to observe primarily because of the hours they keep, the places they live, their secretive nature, and their size (many are small!). In order to conserve and manage mammals, we first need to know where they live, what they eat, how abundant they are, where they go, how long they live, and how many young they have. Come join me this Saturday to learn about commonly used tools for studying the secret lives of mammals – methods to mark, trap, and monitor mammalian species. I will have hands-on activities, demonstrations and hand-outs, plus prizes if you can find the hidden bunnies! I hope to see you there!

Physics Factory

November 26, 2011; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
The Physics Factory is a team of scientists and educators with a common goal: to share their enthusiasm for physics with the community! Through a combination of hands-on learning and eye-popping demonstrations, The Physics Factory aims to show that physics is an exciting process of discovery and invention! Come participate in the fun!

Geology Days at Biosphere 2!

November 19, 2011; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
Geological History of the Santa Catalina Mountains. Biosphere 2 is located in the beautiful Santa Catalina Mountains – how and when did the mountains form? Examine the oldest (1.7 billion years old) and the youngest (28 million years old) and many of the in-between rocks while you learn about the formation of the mountain range.
Rocks, Rocks, and More Rocks. Rocks are all around us and very visible in Arizona. Learn how to identify a few minerals and how to use them to identify most of the common rocks in the area.
Karen J. Gray has an MS in Geology from George Washington University and worked for the U.S. Geological Survey for 24 years. She was involved with many projects, including the study of rock and mineral chemistry and age dating to learn the history of granites, rhyolites and basalts, and the mineral resources associated with them, in many parts of the U.S., Costa Rica, and the Afar region of Ethiopia.

University of Arizona Marine Awareness and Conservation Society

November 19, 2011; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
Come stop by Marine Awareness and Conversation Society's booth! We are one of many UA student organizations, and we'd love to share a little about our knowledge of marine life with you. We have a few real-life examples of preserved animals to show including some very predacious species (we'll even explain what predacious means exactly if you're brave enough to stop by.)! You get to touch and feel actual preserved fish and even more exciting we have a spiny dog fish shark to share with you! Come with your marine questions and we'll have answers!

University of Arizona Sonoran Desert Discovery

November 19, 2011; 10:30 AM - 3:00 PM
Sharing ecologyand natural history through outreach and service learning. UA students have developed engaging hands-on workshops about various Sonoran Desert topics. Come learn with us! For more information visit sdd.arizona.edu. Workshops are appropriate for all ages!

Using Ecology as a Tool to Tackle Global Change Problems

November 12, 2011; 2:00 - 3:00 PM
Marielle Smith, Biosphere 2 Science and Society Fellow, UA Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Our world is under increasing pressure from global change issues such as climate change, habitat destruction, and exotic species invasions. Join me as I share my research experiences around the world and explain how ecology can help us to understand how the natural world will respond to global changes. We will journey from far flung islands in the Indian Ocean, where rapelling down cliffs to collect chicks is helping to conserve a highly endangered species, to the lowland rainforests of Costa Rica, where tramping through thigh deep mud to collect frogs and toads is providing insights into worldwide amphibian extinctions, and many other locations.

DNA Adventure!

November 12, 2011; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
The University of Arizona BIO5 Ambassadors will be sharing a fun cheek-cell DNA extraction activity. To participate, one swishes with salt water in their mouth for one minute. From this, we can extract your DNA so that you can see it in a tube and take it home with you! This is an exciting learning experience that only takes about five minutes!  Come have fun learning with us!

Making a Living the Old Fashioned Way: The Ancient Human Ecology of Arizona

November 5, 2011; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
Matthew Pailes, Biosphere 2 Science and Society Fellow, UA School of Anthropology
Did you know southern Arizona has been continuously farmed for over 3,000 years and lived in for over 13,000 years? The ancient inhabitants of Arizona faced issues of water and resource management similar to the problems we confront today. Come learn about life in the Sonoran Desert before air conditioning. Archaeologist Matthew Pailes from the University of Arizona will be on hand with lots of real artifacts and replicas to touch and examine.

The University of Arizona Astronomy Club

November 5, 2011; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
Astronomy Club's goal is to inspire others to pursue an understanding and appreciation of the universe around us. Come join the club to learn about stars, explosions, gravity and cosmic rays! We will also have telescopes to look safely at the sun and see sunspots larger than the earth! Bring your family and learn how science is exciting!

Forests in the Desert?: Human-Environment Interactions in the Forested River Corridors of the US/Mexico Border Region

October 29, 2011; 2:00 - 3:00 PM
Lily House-Peters, Biosphere 2 Science and Society Fellow, UA School of Geography and Development
The US/Mexico border region contains one of the top ten birding destinations in the world. Forested river corridors in semi-arid regions are vital habitat for many species, including migrating birds. Humans also depend on these riparian areas for a wide range of livelihoods, including ranching, agriculture, mining, recreation, and tourism.  However, changes in rain patterns and temperature and the growth of cities are changing the biophysical dynamics of these forests. As the forested river corridors are altered, peoples’ activities also must change to adapt to these new conditions. My research examines questions of how and why people use riparian corridors in semi-arid regions and the ways that they adapt their behaviors under changing conditions.

University of Arizona Astronomy Club:  Fire and Ice!

October 22, 2011; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
Astronomy Club's goal is to inspire others to pursue an understanding and appreciation of the universe around us. Come join the club to learn about temperature extremes in the universe! Learn about stars and comets as we take a look at our sun through solar telescopes and make ice cream using liquid nitrogen at the same temperature as Saturn! Bring your family and learn how science is cool!

Physics Factory

October 15, 2011; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
The Physics Factory is a team of scientists and educators with a common goal: to share their enthusiasm for physics with the community! Through a combination of hands-on learning and eye-popping demonstrations, The Physics Factory aims to show that physics is an exciting process of discovery and invention! Come participate in the fun!

Marine Awareness and Conservation Society

October 8, 2011; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
Marine Awareness and Conservation Society (MACS) is a student club at theUniversity of Arizona that teaches the public about Marine life. We'd love to share a little about our knowledge of marine life with you.We have a few real-life examples of preserved animals to show includingsome very predacious species (we'll even explain what predacious means ifyou're brave enough to stop by. You get to touch and feel actual preserved fish and even more exciting we have a spiny dog fishshark to share with you! Come with your marine questions, and we'll have answers!

Geology Days at Biosphere 2!

August 20, 2011; 12:00 - 3:00 PM
Geological History of the Santa Catalina Mountains. Biosphere 2 is located in the beautiful Santa Catalina Mountains – how and when did the mountains form? Examine the oldest (1.7 billion years old) and the youngest (28 million years old) and many of the in-between rocks while you learn about the formation of the mountain range.
Rocks, Rocks, and More Rocks. Rocks are all around us and very visible in Arizona. Learn how to identify a few minerals and how to use them to identify most of the common rocks in the area.
Karen J. Gray has an MS in Geology from George Washington University and worked for the U.S. Geological Survey for 24 years. She was involved with many projects, including the study of rock and mineral chemistry and age dating to learn the history of granites, rhyolites and basalts, and the mineral resources associated with them, in many parts of the U.S., Costa Rica, and the Afar region of Ethiopia.

Physics Factory

May 7, 2011; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
The Physics Factory is a team of scientists and educators with a common goal: to share their enthusiasm for physics with the community! Through a combination of hands-on learning and eye-popping demonstrations, The Physics Factory aims to show that physics is an exciting process of discovery and invention! Come participate in the fun!

Marine Awareness and Conservation Society

April 30, 2011; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
Marine Awareness and Conservation Society (MACS) is a student club at the University of Arizona that teaches the public about Marine life. The club brings awareness to the community about problems that the ocean ecosystem is experiencing. The goal is to teach citizens as much as possible about the ocean and how to help conserve it! Activities will include fish diversity where people can learn about different types of fish and have a chance to touch them as well! MACS will also bring along a preserved shark dissection for people to view!

Earth Day 2011

April 23, 2011

UA ADVANCE Sustainable Technologies Data Blitz

April 16, 2011; 11:00 AM - 1:00 PM
UA ADVANCE will host a data blitz on sustainable technology with five notable junior faculty members from different departments and colleges. Dr. Pierre Meystre, Regents’ Professor of Physics and Optical Sciences, and the Director of the B2 Institute at Biosphere 2, will facilitate this session. Five junior faculty members will present a 10-minute synopsis of their research:

  • Dr. Avelino Arellano (Atmospheric Sciences): Toward seamless prediction of chemical weather
  • Dr. Oliver Monti (Chemistry & Biochemistry): Sunlight to electricity with organic solar cells – can plastics save the day?
  • Dr. Iris Patten (Planning): The use of land use conflict mapping to determine renewable energy opportunity
  • Dr. Ryan Perkl (Planning & Arid Lands): Large-scale landscape connectivity modeling
  • Dr. Elizabeth Scott (Landscape Architecture): Comparing the environmental impacts of sustainable versus conventional subdivision design using LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) and sustainable sites initiative performance benchmarks

Fire, Insects, and Climate, Oh My!  A Tree’s Life in Arizona

April 2, 2011; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
Kit O'Connor, Biosphere 2 Science and Society Fellow, School of Natural Resources and the Environment
Have you ever wondered how fire can be a good thing for a tree? Or how bark beetles decide which trees to attack and which to leave alone?  How about the role of climate in determining the forests we have today; or what affect warming temperatures may have on the forests of tomorrow? These are some of the topics that we will explore at Biosphere 2 on April 2 from 11:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. This science outreach event will showcase the work of fire ecology graduate student Kit O’Connor from the University of Arizona Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research and School of Natural Resources and the Environment. We will have a number of activities that explore the role of fire, climate, and insects in Arizona Sky Islands; and the strategies trees use to adapt to the changing environment around them. We hope to see you there!

University of Arizona Sonoran Desert Discovery

March 26, 2011; 10:30 AM - 3:00 PM
Sharing ecology and natural history through outreach and service learning. UA students have developed engaging hands-on workshops about various Sonoran Desert topics. Come learn with us!  For more information visit sdd.arizona.edu. Workshops are appropriate for all ages and include:

  • Between a Rock and a Dry Place: Life in the Intertidal Zone of the Gulf of California
  • Cooperative Hunting: Teamwork Pays Off!
  • Bobcats in our Midst
  • The Desert, Water, and You
  • Plight of Native Arizona Fishes
  • Sonoran Desert Arthropods: Insects, Spiders, Scorpions, and More!

What Does a Scientist Do?

March 26, 2011; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
Pacifica Sommers, Biosphere 2 Science and Society Fellow, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
A scientist tries to learn new things about the world. Challenge yourself to find the answers to five nature puzzles using observation, reasoning, and creativity.

Physics Factory

March 19, 2011; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
The Physics Factory is a team of scientists and educators with a common goal: to share their enthusiasm for physics with the community! Through a combination of hands-on learning and eye-popping demonstrations, The Physics Factory aims to show that physics is an exciting process of discovery and invention! Come participate in the fun!

Marine Awareness and Conservation Society

March 5, 2011; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
Marine Awareness and Conservation Society (MACS) is a student club at the University of Arizona that teaches the public about Marine life. The club brings awareness to the community about problems that the ocean ecosystem is experiencing. The goal is to teach citizens as much as possible about the ocean and how to help conserve it! Activities will include fish diversity where people can learn about different types of fish and have a chance to touch them as well! MACS will also bring along a preserved shark dissection for people to view!  Information about polar bear conservation will be shared as well.

Discovering Skeletons in the Forest

February 26, 2011; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
Ben Blonder, Biosphere 2 Science and Society Fellow, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Enjoy a hands-on exploration of leaf venation networks, featuring a gallery of beautifully stained leaves from around the world that are being used for current research on the global carbon cycle. You will learn how to make leaf skeletons, and be able to bring one home!

Imagining the Future Workshop

February 19, 2011; 10:30 AM - 1:30 PM
Judy Natal, Artist-in-Residence, Biosphere 2
Spaceships! Robots! Biospheres Under Glass!  Come and explore the future with artist Judy Natal, currently in residence at Biosphere 2, and artist Regina Heitzer-Momaday and to create mixed media art work based on discussions, slides, and hands-on general good fun. Explore your imaginations and the stories you want to share, to visualize what the future might look like! The Biospherians did it, and you can too!  Open to all ages and levels of expertise. Participants are encouraged to bring art making and recycled materials, such as old family and pet photos, old toys, computer parts, magazines, recycled paper, sheet music, wall paper, etc. Don't go out and spend money, just gather up what you have around the house. Traditional art making materials will be provided, such as paint, crayon, pencils, tape, glue and scissors. DO bring your imaginations! We will start there. No prior art experience necessary.

Flooding...in Arizona?

February 19, 2011; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
Erin Jordan, Biosphere 2 Science and Society Fellow, Arid Lands Resource Sciences
Believe it or not, the arid Southwest is home to dramatic and deadly flash floods. Risk to life and property is often underestimated, even unknown. University of Arizona PhD student Erin Jordan dives into the causes of flash flooding along with what we know and don't know about the risk.

University of Arizona Astronomy Club

February 19, 2011; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
Astronomy Club's goal is to inspire others to pursue an understanding and appreciation of the universe around us. Come join us alongside the BIO5 Ambassadors to learn about Life in the Universe! Extract your DNA and make your very own comets from liquid nitrogen ice cream! Join in on the fun learning experience!

Physics Factory

February 12, 2011; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
The Physics Factory is a team of scientists and educators with a common goal: to share their enthusiasm for physics with the community! Through a combination of hands-on learning and eye-popping demonstrations, The Physics Factory aims to show that physics is an exciting process of discovery and invention! Come participate in the fun!

University of Arizona Astronomy Club

February 5, 2011; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
Astronomy Club's goal is to inspire others to pursue an understanding and appreciation of the universe around us. Come join us as we explore the wonders of our closest star, the sun! You will also have the opportunity to gaze directly at the sun, safely of course. Come learn something new, and have fun too!

Marine Awareness and Conservation Society

January 29, 2011; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
The University of Arizona Marine Awareness and Conservation Society (MACS) student club actively organizes and participates in outreach events that inform the public about marine life and conservation issues. Activities include hands-on shark and squid dissections, up-close experiences with preserved fish, and more! This spring, the club is planning an annual spring break trip to California in order to clean up beaches, educate communities, and experience the marine ecosystems the members are so passionate about! The booth will be fun and interesting for all ages!

Why Are There So Many Species, and What Are We Going to Do About It?

December 11, 2010; 10:30 - 11:30 AM
Pacifica Sommers, Biosphere 2 Science and Society Fellow, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
If according to Darwin's theory of evolution, species that compete for the same burrows, or prey, or scarce water should not coexist together, why can we observe the coexistence of several types of ground squirrels, of barrel cacti and saguaros, of coyotes and owls? As the rate of extinctions accelerates on earth, understanding how biological diversity is maintained becomes more urgent. This talk will touch on why only so many species could survive indefinitely inside Biosphere2, and explore how much diversity can exist outside.

Geography of Fire: A new synergy of fire, climate, and people is reshaping ecosystems across the globe

December 4, 2010; 10:30 - 11:30 AM
Kit O'Connor, Biosphere 2 Science and Society Fellow, School of Natural Resources and the Environment
Kit O'Connor will introduce fire as an ecosystem process, as a tool that helped humans overcome limitations in their environment, and in the last 150 years, as a mechanism by which humans are rapidly changing entire global systems. This talk will briefly summarize the history of fire on Earth as a driver of plant evolution and landscape change, then as the tool that set early hominids apart from other primates and allowed our species to spread across the globe, and finally the switch from using surface fuels to burning of fossil fuels. With this framing, the talk will explore the fire-related changes to climate, forested ecosystems, and human populations happening in boreal, temperate, and tropical forests. O'Connor will discuss what is happening, what is expected to happen in the near future and how local, national, and international governments are addressing these issues.

University of Arizona BIO5 Ambassadors

December 4, 2010; 10:00 AM - 2:00 PM
The UA BIO5 Ambassadors will be on hand to guide visitors through a fun and interesting DNA activity, Cheek Cell DNA Extraction! This simple activity is great for all age groups! Participants will begin by swishing with salt water, which becomes a sample of the participant's own cells for the experiment. The sample is slowly mixed with simple household dish soap, which breaks open the cells allowing the DNA to float freely in solution. Next, ethanol (an alcohol, similar to that found in hand sanitizer) is added. The DNA is soluble ("compatible") in ethanol, thus allowing the DNA to become visible to the naked eye! Participants will be able to make a necklace to take home to share the wonders of their very own DNA!

University of Arizona Soil, Water and Environmental Science (SWES) Club

December 4, 2010; 10:00 AM - 2:00 PM
Using an interactive display, the UA SWES Club will illustrate groundwater flow. Visitors will have a chance to see what groundwater is, how it moves and how it works. Visitors will have a chance to pump water out and see how that affects the water table. Ideas and concepts such as percolation, water table, and aquifer will be discussed. Club members will also play the "Water Cycle Game: Incredible Journey" with visitors. This is a game that takes players through the journey a droplet of water undergoes during the water cycle. It consists of rolling dice and following the path each individual water molecule undergoes with each player taking a different route dictated by chance while at the same time creating a bead bracelet that represents their journey. Lastly, the club will interpret a watershed model of the Tucson Basin watershed and explain why it is important to manage the watershed. Visitors will be able to add water to the watershed and see how water behaves. The effects of pollution and erosion within a watershed will be illustrated as well. The club will also discuss ways in which the watershed can be managed to help farmlands and industry.

University of Arizona Chemistry and Biochemistry Club

November 20, 2010; 10:00 AM - 2:00 PM
Have you ever wondered what happens when you mix something really cold with something really hot? Or how fireworks in the sky are different colors? Come out and join the University of Arizona Chemistry and Biochemistry Club as we explore some of the wonders of science and find the answers to some of these questions! Our club strives to highlight the fun of chemistry through outreach with the University of Arizona community as well as the greater Tucson area. We will be performing some amazing chemistry "magic" tricks and offer some hands on activities for the kids. Want to know ways you can become "greener" at home? We will also have some amazing chemistry demonstrations exploring the benefits of "green" materials, and be passing out info on how you can decrease your carbon footprint at home by disposing of hazardous waste properly as we debunk some Green Chemistry myths. We hope to see you there!

University of Arizona Sonoran Desert Discovery

November 20, 2010; 10:30 AM - 2:30 PM
Sharing ecology and natural history through outreach and service learning. UA students have developed engaging hands-on workshops about various Sonoran Desert topics. Workshops are appropriate for all ages. Come learn with us! We will be offering 7 workshops:

  • Incredible Edible Desert – what can you eat and how does it grow here.
  • Pollination – what is it? who does it? why do we need it?
  • Invasive Species – how do new species threaten native ecosystems?
  • Coloration and Crypsis – why do plants and animals vary so much in color and visibility?
  • Big Cats – more Sonoran Desert diversity than you might think!
  • Dam the Desert – importance of stream ecosystems and impacts of dams.
  • Toxic Species – which ones? why be toxic? how can you tell?

University of Arizona Astronomy Club

November 13, 2010; 10:00 AM - 2:00 PM
Have you ever wondered how high you might be able to jump on the moon? What about Mars or even Saturn? Come join the University of Arizona Astronomy Club for a fun filled day learning about space! Learn how high you can jump on all the planets of the solar system, and make some useful tools to help you navigate the night sky. Come with any questions you have about astronomy and space, we'd be happy to answer them.

University of Arizona Solar Cats

November 13, 2010; 10:00 AM - 2:00 PM
Did you know that Tucson gets over 350 days of sunlight every year? How can we use this sunlight to produce energy? Join the University of Arizona SolarCats club to learn about photovoltaic cells, renewable energy, and ways to reduce your energy usage around the home. Activities include our solar-powered water fountain and coloring pages. Come and learn about how we're bringing solar energy to the U of A!

Geocaching for Ecological Assets: An Interactive Citizen Science Primer

November 13, 2010; 10:30 - 11:30 AM
Kristin Wisneski, Biosphere 2 Science and Society Fellow, School of Natural Resources and the Environment
Want to be a citizen scientist? Come and learn how to get started and test out your observation skills on a specially designed Ecological Asset Mapping course at the Biosphere 2. Together we will learn why citizen scientists and the observations they make are so important for understanding the environmental changes going on in our big world. Geospatial tools like GPS can help with recording the location of our observations in nature, so we will spend the second half of this session searching out eco-treasure using a GPS receiver while learning about the Southwest ecology outside the Biosphere 2.

Marine Awareness and Conservation Society

November 13, 2010; 10:00 AM - 2:00 PM
Marine Awareness and Conservation Society (MACS) is a student club at the University of Arizona that teaches the public about Marine life. The club brings awareness to the community about problems that the ocean ecosystem is experiencing. The goal is to teach citizens as much as possible about the ocean and how to help conserve it! MACS will be running its Fish Diversity station where people can come and touch preserved fish and learn all about those fish and interesting facts about them. To honor Save the Manatees month, MACS will share interesting facts about Manatees, and the Save the Manatee Club will be passing out flyers and bookmarks, to help people learn about saving this wonderful mammal! Finally MACS will have a preserved shark for people to see and feel while learning all about the shark and some conservation issues.

University of Arizona Astronomy Club

November 6, 2010; 10:00 AM - 2:00 PM
Have you ever seen a shooting star, a comet, or looked at the moon through a telescope? Come join the University of Arizona Astronomy Club for a fun filled day learning about rocks from space. We will have a collection of meteorites for you to touch, analyze, and learn all about. We will also be making comets and learning about craters. Be prepared to be amazed at the astronomical wonders around us! Come with any questions you have about astronomy and space, we'd be happy to answer them.

SAGUARO Diversity in Geosciences

October 30, 2010; 10:00 AM - 2:00 PM
Take a walk through Earth's history! Learn about the weird and wonderful creatures that have inhabited our planet over time. We'll have a hands on display of fossils, you can help us dig for dinosaurs like a real paleontologist, and even find some fossils of your own!

Marine Awareness and Conservation Society

October 24, 2010; 10:00 AM - 2:00 PM
Marine Awareness and Conservation Society (MACS) is a student club at the University of Arizona that teaches the public about Marine life. The club brings awareness to the community about problems that the ocean ecosystem is experiencing. The goal is to teach citizens as much as possible about the ocean and how to help conserve it! Activities will include fish diversity where people can learn about different types of fish and have a chance to touch them as well! MACS will also bring along a preserved shark for people to view! Not only will they be viewing the outside but also the dissected inside! Kids can "build a fish" too! Information about tragic dolphin mortality around the world will be shared as well.

University of Arizona Neuroscience Club

October 23, 2010; 10:00 AM - 2:00 PM
The Neuroscience Club at the University of Arizona will be hosting a variety of fun and educational activities for the public. The Neuroscience Club at the UA's mission is to spread awareness of neuroscience to the public. A mid-thoracic human spinal cord section will be on display for the public to see and to learn about. A brain zoo with several different animal brains will be on display as well. The public will learn about the differences between human and animal brains and the important features of the different animal brains will be emphasized. An optical illusion station that illustrates the brain's ability to adapt to its environment will be available for the public to participate in as well.

Southwest Climate Risk

October 23, 2010; 10:30 - 11:30 AM
Erin Jordan, Biosphere 2 Science and Society Fellow, Arid Lands Resource Sciences
This talk will focus on present day climate variability and the associated risks in the Southwest United States. The interactive presentation will look at some of the Southwest climate theories, uncertainty, recent research, and extreme events.

University of Arizona Astronomy Club

October 16, 2010; 10:00 AM - 2:00 PM
Have you ever wondered how big our universe is? Come join the University of Arizona Astronomy Club for a day of fun filled science demonstrations that help to put some perspective on the space around us. Activities include: looking at the sun (safely!), strolling through the solar system, ice in the universe, and 3D local star models. Be prepared to be amazed at the astronomical wonders around us! Come with any questions you have about astronomy and space, we'd be happy to answer them.

Marine Awareness and Conservation Society

October 10, 2010; 10:00 AM - 2:00 PM
Marine Awareness and Conservation Society (MACS) is a student club at the University of Arizona that teaches the public about Marine life. The club brings awareness to the community about problems that the ocean ecosystem is experiencing. The goal is to teach citizens as much as possible about the ocean and how to help conserve it! Activities will include fish diversity where people can learn about different types of fish and have a chance to touch them as well! MACS will also bring along a preserved shark for people to view! Not only will they be viewing the outside but also the dissected inside! Information about tragic dolphin mortality around the world will be shared as well.

Secrets of the Naked Leaf

October 2, 2010; 10:30 - 11:30 AM
Benjamin Blonder, Biosphere 2 Science and Society Fellow, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Why do plants have leaves, and why do leaves come in so many sizes and shapes? This talk will explore the link between form and function in leaves with a visually rich tour of plant diversity. Learn how carbon flux research in the mountains of Colorado and Arizona is revealing new secrets of leaves. And find out why the hidden and beautiful world of leaf venation networks is central to all these questions!

The Fin Foundation

September 11, 2010; 10:00 AM - 2:00 PM
The Fin Foundation reaches out into the community with presentations on ocean life and marine conservation. Using marine artifacts such as shark jaws and shells for hands-on learning experiences, The Fin Foundation allows people who live far from the ocean to experience sea life up close! In addition to marine artifacts, the Fin Foundation uses vivid photography and video images to enhance presentations. The Fin Foundation presents to all ages from pre-school through college and for a wide variety of community groups. The Fin Foundation is a consortium of marine biologists, educators, ocean enthusiasts, photographers and community volunteers working to bring marine science and ocean awareness to communities across the Southwest.

Marine Awareness and Conservation Society

September 11, 2010; 10:00 AM - 2:00 PM
Marine Awareness and Conservation Society (MACS) is a student club at the University of Arizona that teaches the public about Marine life. The club brings awareness to the community about problems the ocean ecosystem is experiencing. The goal is to teach citizens as much as possible about the ocean and how to help conserve it! Activities will include fish diversity and a section about the BP oil spill and how it is affecting the animals in the Gulf of Mexico. The BP oil spill is the club's cause for the month of September, and the club will have different causes each month to bring awareness about all the problems the marine ecosystem is having. Fish Diversity is an activity where the club shows people preserved fish and what they do and how they function! There will be many different fish for everyone to see and touch!

SAGUARO Diversity in Geosciences

​June 12, 2010; 10:00 AM - 1:00 PM
SAGUARO will walk you through Earth's history and tell you about some of its most interesting inhabitants through time. Join us for hands-on activities with fossils and then dig for one you can take home for yourself!

Physics Factory

May 8, 2010; 12:30-3:30 PM
The Physics Factory is a team of scientists and educators with a common goal: to share their enthusiasm for physics with the community! Through a combination of hands-on learning and eye-popping demonstrations, The Physics Factory aims to show that physics is an exciting process of discovery and invention! Come participate in the fun!

The National Phenology Network: Taking the Pulse of Our Planet

April 25, 2010; 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM
Gary Woodard, Assoc. Director SAHRA Water Center, University of Arizona
Learn how tens of thousands of citizen scientists are being recruited to monitor the impacts of climate change on plants and animals. Phenology is the study of how climatic cycles impact plants and animal behavior, including when plants leaf out, flower, and produce fruit, and when animals hibernate, migrate and reproduce. Changes in seasonal temperatures and precipitation are affecting the phenophases of many species, altering our deserts and mountains. Learn about how to volunteer to monitor plants and animals at home, school, or work and find out how to construct a phenology garden.

Dendrochronology: More Than Just Counting Tree Rings

April 24, 2010; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
Dan Griffin, B2 Science and Society Fellow
Dan will present a display of tree-ring samples and interact with visitors to interpret their environmental significance.

SAGUARO Diversity in Geosciences

April 24, 2010; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
SAGUARO interns will bring an interactive display of the basin and range geology of the southwestern United States. Interested visitors will learn how the mountains all around them formed, and why the pattern of "mountain range-valley-mountain range-valley" is so persistent in this part of the country. SAGUARO is a group that aims to promote diversity in the geosciences. SAGUARO hires high school and undergraduate interns from traditionally underrepresented groups and supports them to work on a geosciences related project with faculty mentors.

Posada San Pedro Solar Powered

April 24, 2010; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
The students of the University of Arizona club Posada San Pedro Solar Powered (PSPSP) are determined to bring solar paneling not only to university residence halls, but to Biosphere 2! They are here today demonstrating the usefulness of solar panels and how their energy can power things we can use in our everyday lives. Their solar powered mister system allows all ages to see firsthand how panels convert the sun's rays into electricity and see just how much energy is being produced. Be sure to stop by and see how it works and learn more about the project these students are conducting at the university. They would love to answer any questions and share with you their story!

Earth Day 2010 at Biosphere 2!

April 17, 2010; All day.

Green Tales for a Blue Planet: Old Stories to Guide our New Way with the World

April 10, 2010; 2:00 - 3:00 PM
Jordan Hill, Storyteller
Jordan Hill is a supremely animated professional storyteller and wondering/wandering minstrel. The traditional tales he tells bursting with energy, enchantment, and adventure deepen and enliven listener s relationships to elements of science and nature. While the stories grow out of such roots deep in the world around us, Jordan in turn roots himself so firmly in the expansive world of the story that listeners cannot help but join him there, as their imaginations fly alongside of him through further worlds wonderful and joyous.

Creativity and Consilience Art Exhibit Grand Opening!

March 27, 2010
Environmental Biology (ECOL 206) * Conservation Biology (ECOL 406): If we are to be successful in alerting the public to the challenges and risks inherent in environmental degradation and loss of biodiversity then we must promote alternative modes of communication. One of the more effective avenues for reaching a broad audience on multiple levels is through art (broadly defined). In two of my courses I assign a creativity project. The goal of this project is to foster the talents of students in non-traditional ways such that students internalize and recall more deeply the major lessons and themes of each course. Tapping into students’ creativity also allows for increased connections between the course material and different spheres and experiences personal to each student. Over the years it has been my pleasure to work with talented individuals who have opened their minds and hearts to create fantastic and moving works of literature, sculpture, painting, photography and myriad other artistic pieces.

Sonoran Desert Discovery: Hot Topics in Ecology!

March 27, 2010; 9:00 AM - 3:00 PM
Student-developed science-education workshops! Come learn about the Sonoran Desert through demonstrations and hands-on activities! Student presentation topics include:

  • Mutualism: Senita Cactus and Senita Moth
  • Invasion of Fire: Buffelgrass and Sonoran Desert Fire Ecology
  • Riparian and Wetland Habitat: Imperiled Anchors of the Sonoran Desert
  • Water Where? Surprising Aquatic Habitats in the Sonoran Desert
  • Predator-Prey Relationships in the Sonoran Desert

Fin Foundation

March 20, 2010; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
The Fin Foundation reaches out into the community with presentations on ocean life and marine conservation. Using marine artifacts such as shark jaws and shells for hands-on learning experiences, The Fin Foundation allows people who live far from the ocean to experience sea life up close! In addition to marine artifacts, the Fin Foundation uses vivid photography and video images to enhance presentations. The Fin Foundation presents to all ages from pre-school through college and for a wide variety of community groups. The Fin Foundation is a consortium of marine biologists, educators, ocean enthusiasts, photographers and community volunteers working to bring marine science and ocean awareness to communities across the Southwest.

Physics Factory

March 13, 2010; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
The Physics Factory is a team of scientists and educators with a common goal: to share their enthusiasm for physics with the community! Through a combination of hands-on learning and eye-popping demonstrations, The Physics Factory aims to show that physics is an exciting process of discovery and invention! Come participate in the fun!

Stories to Grow On: Tales of Our Friends in the Plant World

March 6, 2010; 2:00 - 3:00 PM
Jordan Hill, Storyteller
Jordan Hill is a supremely animated professional storyteller and wondering/wandering minstrel. The traditional tales he tells bursting with energy, enchantment, and adventure deepen and enliven listeners' relationships to elements of science and nature. While the stories grow out of such roots deep in the world around us, Jordan in turn roots himself so firmly in the expansive world of the story that listeners cannot help but join him there, as their imaginations fly alongside of him through further worlds wonderful and joyous.

Fin Foundation

February 27, 2010; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
The Fin Foundation reaches out into the community with presentations on ocean life and marine conservation. Using marine artifacts such as shark jaws and shells for hands-on learning experiences, The Fin Foundation allows people who live far from the ocean to experience sea life up close! In addition to marine artifacts, the Fin Foundation uses vivid photography and video images to enhance presentations. The Fin Foundation presents to all ages from pre-school through college and for a wide variety of community groups. The Fin Foundation is a consortium of marine biologists, educators, ocean enthusiasts, photographers and community volunteers working to bring marine science and ocean awareness to communities across the Southwest.

Aquatic Insects of Arizona

February 20, 2010; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
Chris Goforth, B2 Science and Society Fellow
Come participate in a hands-on, booth style presentation focusing on the aquatic insects of Arizona! See live insects and view a variety of pinned specimens as you become more aware of what is lurking in the waters of our state. A short activity will help you focus on one or two insects in more detail. Chris will also answer questions about aquatic insects and will provide a handout on water gardening to attract aquatic insects to your home.

Physics Factory

February 6, 2010; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
The Physics Factory is a team of scientists and educators with a common goal: to share their enthusiasm for physics with the community! Through a combination of hands-on learning and eye-popping demonstrations, The Physics Factory aims to show that physics is an exciting process of discovery and invention! Come participate in the fun!

Plastics!

January 23, 2010; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
Alandra Kahl, B2 Science and Society Fellow
What do the labels on the bottoms of plastic bottles mean? What and how should I recycle? What is BPA and why should I be concerned about it? How can I avoid exposure to BPA? Get the answers to these and other questions as Alandra presents different types of plastics, explains what the recycling symbols mean, and explains which are the best to choose to avoid harmful chemicals.

The Physics Factory

January 2, 2010; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
The Physics Factory is a team of scientists and educators with a common goal: to share their enthusiasm for physics with the community! Through a combination of hands-on learning and eye-popping demonstrations, The Physics Factory aims to show that physics is an exciting process of discovery and invention! Come participate in the fun!

The Physics Factory

December 12, 2009; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
The Physics Factory is a team of scientists and educators with a common goal: to share their enthusiasm for physics with the community! Through a combination of hands-on learning and eye-popping demonstrations, The Physics Factory aims to show that physics is an exciting process of discovery and invention! Come participate in the fun!

Marine Awareness and Conservation Society (MACS)

December 5, 2009; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
MACS is a student-run outreach club at the University of Arizona that educates the public about how to conserve the ocean. Activites used in this effort include: a hands-on fish diversity station that shares fun facts about preserved fish (gloves are provided); a fish building station where kids and adults can make their own fish using their imaginations; and a plankton station where people can view plankton samples. Also available are sea food guides on the best types of sustainable sea food choices when eating out, as well as information about the vaquita, an endangered species in the Sea of Cortez.

Tree-Ring Dating: An Introduction and Applications in Climatology, Ecology, Archeology, and Conservation

December 5, 2009; 2:00-3:00 PM
Dan Griffin, Biosphere 2 Science and Society Fellow
This presentation will review dendrochronology and some of its salient applications. The principal tenets behind tree-ring science, including cross-dating, environmental site selection, sample replication, and uniformitarianism will be discussed. An overview of several of the fellow's tree-ring projects will be given, with applications in climatology, ecology, archeology, and conservation.

Ecosystem Movers and Shakers: Microbial Ecology Under Our Feet and in Our Gardens

November 28, 2009; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
Bryan Moravec, Biosphere 2 Science and Society Fellow
In this hands-on activity, visitors will have a chance to microscopically view 3 incubated soils collected from around Tucson and will get to perform a contact slide assay to see the diversity and abundance of different soil microbial populations. Participants will: 1) learn that microbes live in the soil; 2) observe how fertilizers increase microbe communities in soil and make them more robust; 3) see how sodium affected soils are simply dead or devoid of microbes; and 4) learn how all plants rely on soil microbes for access to nutrients. Soil microbial identification pictures will be available to assist participants in identifying microbes observed in the microscope.

Sonoran Desert Discovery: Ethnobotany: Eating Desert Diversity

November 21, 2009; 9:00 AM - 3:00 PM
Kelly Arganbright, Gina Watkinson
This workshop introduces ethnobotany of the Sonoran Desert. Find out how native tribes survived in the desert by living off the land. Explore how genetic diversity is important ecologically, evolutionarily, and economically and even how it plays a factor in modern day health concerns. Enjoy soup made of ancient desert heirloom beans. Kids can paint with traditional cochineal dye using paintbrushes they have made! Discover how you can incorporate desert plants into your own diet to promote genetic diversity and improve health.

Water and Life: Exhibit Opening

November 21, 2009
"Water and Life" is a new exhibit on the relationship between liquid water and the evolution of life on earth. Water has played a pivotal role in human culture, religion, food gathering, conflict, and exploration; the evolving geology of the earth; and the evolution of all life on our planet, even in the most extreme environments. The exhibit, located in the human habitat building, includes artifacts, hands-on interactives, and images. The exhibit is the first of three slated to open that will cover water and supports one of Biosphere 2's missions which is to catalyze interdisciplinary thinking and understanding about the Earth, its living systems, and its future, as well as improving understanding of soil-water-atmosphere-plant-society interactions providing insight into the impacts and causes of global environmental change and variation.

Sonoran Desert Discovery “Slithery Situation: Threats to Local Biodiversity”

November 14, 2009; 9:00 AM - 3:00 PM
Michael Weiss & Seth Wisniewski Smith
In this workshop we will be exploring the Desert Tortoise and the Lowland Leopard Frog as two examples of native species that are under pressure from a number of dangers. An interactive discussion session for each species will explain who each animal is and exactly what challenges are threatening their existence. Human development and expansion is threatening a journey Desert Tortoises have needed for millions of years to keep the genetics of their populations alive; an invasive species of bullfrog is outcompeting our local Lowland Leopard Frogs and carrying with it a deadly fungus that is decimating amphibian populations. We will be playing games, collecting scientific data, and singing a song to drive the points home in a fun and memorable way. Everyone will have the chance to write down a suggestion for addressing the issues presented, and will be entered into a raffle to win cool Biosphere2 stuff!

Tracking Trace Organics: What’s In Your Water?

November 14, 2009; 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Alandra Kahl, Biosphere 2 Science and Society Fellow
Is it time to nix the Nalgene? Pharmaceutical compounds in water are a growing concern, especially as water scarcity increases and we look to other sources to obtain water. Widespread domestic use of compounds like BPA, flame retardants, and anti-microbials contribute to their eventual appearance in municipal wastewater. In this talk, Alandra Kahl, a graduate student at the University of Arizona, will discuss her work on tracking trace compounds like these in water resources, specifically wetlands. Wetlands are highly productive ecosystems that are often used for remediation, even that of effluent and biosolids from wastewater. Wastewater is also a primary entryway for trace organics into the environment. Current research focuses on tracking and possibly treating these compounds with wetlands as a sustainable solution.

The Physics Factory

November 14, 2009; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
The Physics Factory is a team of scientists and educators with a common goal: to share their enthusiasm for physics with the community! Through a combination of hands-on learning and eye-popping demonstrations, The Physics Factory aims to show that physics is an exciting process of discovery and invention! Come participate in the fun!

The Evolution of Evolution: Darwin Then and Now

November 14, 2009; 2:00 - 3:00 PM
David Reznick, Professor, University of California, Riverside
Ernst Mayr was one of the foremost evolutionary biologists of the 20th century and a major figure in shaping our modern concept of species and speciation. When I read this quote, it distressed me, since I and most others thought that Darwin wrote about the origin of species. It took me over 20 years to reconcile Darwin and Mayr and to confirm that The Origin of Species was indeed about the origin of species. Doing so means envisioning the Origin's place in a stream of science. There were concepts of species and speciation before Darwin, but Darwin's vision forever changed our thinking. The scientists who followed did not see the Origin as a statement of truth, but rather as a challenge to first ask if Darwin was correct, then to study the consequences of what Darwin referred to as "transmutation" (his word for speciation). In the process, the theory of evolution evolved, as did our understanding of what a species is and how speciation occurs. Mayr's statement is a measure of the divide between Darwin's understanding of speciation in 1859 and Mayr's in 1942. Evolution has continued to evolve since Mayr. This talk will describe our evolving understanding of the meaning of species and the process of speciation.

Sonoran Desert Discovery: Biological Pollution

November 7, 2009; 9:00 AM - 3:00 PM
Josh Ruddick, Alex Lichtblau, Emily Kaleugher
Biological pollutants alter the ecology of the area and threaten specific species. These pollutants are often introduced intentionally by humans to solve other issues. Focusing on three examples of human interventions that have adversely affected Sonoran Desert ecology we will examine two invasive species and one instance of human recovery efforts gone awry. Learn about the research coming from the University of Arizona, and our commitment to bettering the natural world around us. Find out how you can get involved and help stem the tide of invasive species and how you can prevent future pollutants from being introduced into our Sonoran Desert. Come see our workshop on Biological Pollutants!

Sonoran Desert Discovery: Marine Life in a Desert Community

October 31, 2009; 9:00 AM - 3:00 PM
Janel Michels & Anna Alderman
When you think of a desert, the last thing that comes to mind is aquatic life. Yet, the Sonoran desert is divided by one of the most diverse marine ecosystems- the Sea of Cortez. Come and learn about the various types of sea stars, sea urchins, and sea cucumbers in the Sea of Cortez and interact with some live aquatic life. Learn what these marine animals eat and where they live. Observe how human activity in the Sonoran desert affects the Sea of Cortez and learn about current conservation efforts. Lots of interactive demonstrations and activities are provides for people of all ages.

Sonoran Desert Discovery: Monsters of the Deep: The Secret Lives of Giant Water Bugs

October 31, 2009; 2:00 - 3:00 PM
Chris Goforth, Biosphere 2 Science and Society Fellow
In this fun, lighthearted lecture, Chris will cover some of the interesting behaviors of the giant water bugs, focusing on the species of Arizona, and how they interact with their environment. Chris will share some of her data from her own research program, and she will pass around bugs and other “hands-on” items to handle as well!

Top Carnivores in the Ecosystem: Preventing Environmental Collapse

October 24, 2009; 9:00 AM - 3:00 PM
Aletris M. Neils and Geoffrey H. Palmer
Apex predators play a crucial roll in maintaining ecosystem functions, and yet human activities continue to reduce predator populations and sometimes even drive them to extinction. We will be discussing the importance of apex predators in preserving biological diversity, and focus on the five top predators native to Arizona; the mountain lion, jaguar, Mexican wolf, black bear, and grizzly bear. We will recount the stories of the past persecution of these predators, and present the current conservation efforts to preserve remaining populations. We will have skulls, tracks, and skins of these Arizona predators on hand to teach distinctive characteristics for identification, and have an activity that illustrates the impact top predators have on ecosystems.

The Physics Factory

October 3, 2009; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
The Physics Factory is a team of scientists and educators with a common goal: to share their enthusiasm for physics with the community! Through a combination of hands-on learning and eye-popping demonstrations, The Physics Factory aims to show that physics is an exciting process of discovery and invention! Come participate in the fun!

Building of the Biosphere: Special Talk by Bernd Zabel

September 26th, 1:00 PM
How and why did Biosphere 2 come into being? What kinds of architectural and engineering challenges were overcome? Were new technologies developed? What kinds of materials and building techniques were used during construction? Come hear answers to these and many other fascinating questions from Bernd Zabel, Biosphere 2’s original construction general manager. Bernd Zabel was raised in Munich, where he graduated with a Master’s degree in electrical engineering from the Technical University. He also received his certification as a teacher. In 1985, Bernd joined the Biosphere 2 project in Tucson as general manager of construction for the three-acre sealed experimental system. Designed to create a living laboratory in which to study ecological processes at work in the biosphere of planet Earth, Biosphere 2 originally contained tropical rainforest, savannah, marsh, ocean, desert and agriculture ecosystems, as well as a sophisticated human residence and monitoring facility. Bernd also trained as a Biosphere 2 crew candidate for five years and helped develop the aquaculture systems of Biosphere 2. In 1994, he lived sealed inside Biosphere 2 for six months as a crewmember during Biosphere 2’s second mission. He served as Director of Engineering and Biospheric Operations with responsibility for all operating systems that maintain the atmosphere, living conditions, and physical structure of Biosphere 2. In 2000 he resigned as the General Manager of Biosphere 2 to pursue independent consulting projects.

The Physics Factory

September 12th, 2009; 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
The Physics Factory is a team of scientists and educators with a common goal: to share their enthusiasm for physics with the community! Through a combination of hands-on learning and eye-popping demonstrations, The Physics Factory aims to show that physics is an exciting process of discovery and invention! Come participate in the fun!

Who is Tucson’s Midnight Raider of Hummingbird Feeders?

August 29th, 2009; 12:00 PM
Featuring Ted Fleming, PhD, Emeritus Professor, University of Miami and Adjunct Professor, University of Arizona
In recent years, nectar-feeding bats have begun visiting many hummingbird feeders throughout the greater Tucson area. This talk will review the ecology of lesser long-nosed bats (Leptonycteris yerbabuenae), the principal midnight raider, and will describe a monitoring program that aims to understand its use of hummingbird feeders in an urban setting. Away from Tucson, this bat is a major pollinator of columnar cacti in the Sonoran Desert and of paniculate agaves in upland parts of southern Arizona. It is a federally endangered species, so that factors influencing its foraging behavior are of great interest. Learn how you can volunteer to help as a citizen-scientist in the feeder-monitoring program.